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mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are
're already important for us. because many conflicts are around us. so therefore our attempt, our word and our insistence to contribute to the solution of the problems is appreciated. >> couric: and the prime minister of the palestinian authority, salam fayyad. >> it's one that's based definitely on dealing violence out of the equation for sure. that's our interest. that's how we defined it. from our point of view. it happens to be consistent with obligations that we took on the road map and going back to 1993. it's in our best interest, we're not doing no one else a favor but ourselves when we subscribe to nonviolence. as a really key component to what we have to do to get to freedom. >> couric: a program note: our interview with the c.e.o. of google, eric schmidt, will be seen at a later date. tonight, the president of turkey and the prime minister of the palestinian authority when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: abdullah gul is here, he's the president of turkey, a key u.s. ally and nato member, turke
a third happened here. we joined british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show us what they achieved, all the project have -- how the province has prospered and how much safer and has become, but this is what we saw. [gunshots fired] a brutal fight for much of the day. it does not happen much anymore, but it shows the taliban battling coalition troops. and now america must finish the job britain started. no british troops at this time, they have faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about. without someone having been there, you cannot describe the smells, the sites, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to be there and, the emotions -- to have a true understanding of what people here go through. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet mellon for the troops. there happen -- they are happy to be going, but their regret the mission is far from over. >> the amount of effort, time, live
is important and facebook is a consequence and very impressive company. and social information will be used by google and by others, i should add, to make the quality of the results, the quality of the experience that much better. the pore we foe about what your friends do with your permission, and i need to say that about 500 times, we can actually use that to improve the experience you have of getting information that you care about. in our case what we're actually do something building social information into all of our products. so it won't be a social network the way people think of facebook but rather social information about who your friends are, people that you interact with. and we have various ways in which we will be collecting that information. >> we continue with the film wall street money never sleeps with the director all i ver stone and two of the jars, josh brolin and shia labeouf. >> the 2 o 008 market is more difficult to understand with credit default swaps and insurance and all that stuff. but we made it a background. that's the way we treated it. we treated the crisis,
in france is being watched closely, because europe faces us see us strikes as governments bareback cherished benefits. bbc news, paris. >> the spanish prime minister and has called on a basket separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. -- of basque separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. mozambique has reversed its decision to raise bread prices by 30%. food riots last week left 13 dead. bread will now be sold at its previous price of 14 cents. every year since 1998, more than 30,000 japanese people have killed themselves. japan's health ministry estimates cases of suicide and depression caused the economy $32 billion last year. the government has launched a task force to address the problem. more than two weeks of political deadlock have ended in australia with confirmation that labor's julia gillard will continue as prime minister, would be backing, at last, of to independenct mp's. she has been near west possible majority. nick bryant has this. >> it is like the finale of a tv reality show, with the winner kept a closely-guarded secret until announced live on television.
are joining us. and we are remembering jefferson thomas, all coming up. et >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: john boyd, jr. is president of the national black farmers' association. he held a press conference to highlight the failure of the congress to approve a settlement. he joins us tonight from new york. good to have you. >> good to be here, and i want to thank you for being involved with the black farmers and continuing to raise the issue. tavis: it is my pleasure, and i wanted to have you on tonight because after years of dealing with this, all that needs
and doesn't help the u.s. economic recovery. but geithner said he was not prepared to label china a "currency manipulator" under u.s. law. >> tom: that reluctance was all too familiar to members of congress, and they grilled geithner with hostile questions. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: even the senators grilling the treasury secretary today admit hearings on china's overvalued currency have become something of a ritual over the years. it begins with the expression of outrage from senators like new york's charles schumer. >> at a time when the u.s. economy is trying to pick itself up off the ground, china's currency manipulation is like a boot to the throat of our recovery. and this administration refuses to try to take that boot off our neck. >> reporter: then, it's the treasury secretary's turn to share concern, to offer tougher rhetoric, and then to explain that declaring china a currency manipulator under the current law will do little more than require more consultations, as treasury secretary geithner explained today. >> wishing something does not make it so, and issuin
. >> reporter: vincent reinhart used to help the fed meet its dual mandate as a senior policy adviser. with unemployment at close to 10%, he says it's clear the economy isn't operating anywhere close to maximum employment, which is closer to 5%. and what about price stability? indicators of core inflation are under 1%, with many prices flat or falling. but that isn't the same as price stability. >> it's possible to have too much of a good thing. >> reporter: why? because periods of high unemployment tend to push prices down and prices are not stable when they are rising or falling too much. >> as inflation starts falling and maybe even veering into deflation, the real value of what you have to pay back goes up and up and up. so it's harder for people who borrow, including the u.s. government, in that regard. >> reporter: with the fed failing to meet either of its mandates, economist josh bivens says the conclusion is clear. >> you're missing both mandates, but in the same direction for once. we're not acting aggressively enough to drive down unemployment, and we're not even acting agg
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, theen engine that connects us. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation, supporting science, technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama spent this labor day in the midwest to rally with union members and unveil a new plan to promote job growth. but even as he sharpend his focus on the economy, his political opponents sharpened their responses. >> around the nation this holiday, parades, barbecues and a continuing unease over the dismal jobs market. coming just after friday's report showing unemployment had edgeded up again to 9.6%, this was a labor day in which the state of the american work force was very much front and center. with that in mind and with a mid-term election just two months off
>> rose: welcome to our program. tonight, stephanie d'alessandro and john elderfield take us on a tour of a new matisse exhibit at the museum of modern art. >> it's a period when matisse really seemed to have very intently stopped the kind of work he was doing before and began searching for something and we can chart him through the evolution of "bathers by a river" in fact and then i think through "the exhibition" trying different modes of painting. bringing together different styles, avant-garde styles of the time, ways of making the surface of works very different and reworked. and we watch him not sure where he's going but excited about the possibility of a new kind of art for himself and we feel that for matisse that was a kind of radical invention. he said about "bathers by a river" and "moroccans" that they were two of the most pivotal works of his career. i think it's important he used the word "pivotal" and not "important." it suggests there was a change that those works brought about in his career and i think that's part of what that radical invention is about. >> i
in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
in europe and the possible threat in the u.s. >> brown: margaret warner examines china's growing economic and military assertiveness in asia and globally. >> they're breaking diplomatic egg which is three or four years ago they would not have broken. so i think the change is palpable. >> woodruff: we talk to former clinton administration secretary of labor robert reich-- the last in our series of conversations on extending the bush-era tax breaks. >> brown: and jonathan miller of "independent television news" reports from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the
of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy's george -- middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of talks between israel and palestinians. the pope has described the uk as a third-world country. welcome to "bbc world news" -- broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also of around the globe. coming up later for you, against a backdrop of st. protests, france's lower house passes the bill which raises the retirement age from 60 to 62, and hope for track and chile's miners. -- trapped miners. a new arrival lists some of the gloom -- lifts some of the gloom. hello to you. millions of people across central and western africa are going hungry. yes, the numbers are in the millions. the worst of the country is even larger than the states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. delta been flooding of ruined crops, and some help has arrived, but it has not been enough. we have this special report. >> according to the united nations, development terms, it is the world's poorest nation. for the past year, the united nations has been appealing to the internation
sergeant olaf schmidt. >> almost a third happened here. in sangin. we join british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show was they've achieved, how the area has proffered prospered, how much safer it's become. but this is what we saw. a long and brutal fight throughout much of the day. it doesn't happen all the time anymore, but it shows the taliban still battling coalition troops. and now america must try to finish the job britain started. no british troops were injured this time but they faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about actually having someone have been there, you can't describe the smells, the sights, there's no way to describe all this, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to actually be there and go through the emotions to have a true understanding of what the people here go,000. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet moment for the troops. they're happy to be g
of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the health care reform law reached a kind of anniversary today, six months since president obama signed it into law, big new changes are set to take effect. health correspondent betty ann bowser has the story. >> hey, everybody. hello, hello! good to see you guys! >> reporter: the president marked the occasion in a northern virginia neighborhood today. his goal: to sell the six-month- old law to voters, six weeks before the mid-term elections. >> and so what we realized was we had to take some steps to start dealing with these underlying, chronic problems that have confronted our economy for a very long time. and health care was one of those issues that we could
writes the autobiography of our species. >> rose: right. >> so we are used to the story and we tell the story about the way we live. we train kid dpos to go to college. we train them in reasoning skills am we give them technical skills we have a series of strategies that people learn when they go into management. how to network, how to make decisions. and that is the story of human life told from the conscious level. but the revolution of consciousness tells us that below that level there's a more important and more fundamental level and more powerful and in some ways smarter level. and so my book is a description of life and the lives of two people told from that, of that underlevel. >> rose: the lives of two people. >> yeah, i make up characters. i have fictional characters just so exempt few. >> rose: but tell us about what you have found out about the unconscious mind. >> a couple things are important. the first is that we're shaped in so many ways by these unconscious decisions. in trivial ways, i mention by a study by a guy in buffalo that people named dennis are disproportion
on the people, especially the children. >> they're getting to the heart of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of the talks between israelis and palestinians. a senior vatican official describes the uk as a third world country. he has pulled out of the pope's statement. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america, also run the globe. coming up later, outside, the streets ring with protests. inside, france's lower house passes the bill which will raise the retirement age from 60 to 62, and serving therapy. can riding a wave help you call for mental health problems? public service is putting in health care money to find out. hello to you. millions -- yes, millions -- of people are going hungry at this moment across central and western africa. the worst affected country is niger, a country even larger than the united states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. the drought's amid flooding of ruined crops. help has not been enough. we go to niger for this special report. >> according to the united nations, in development terms, niger
, which have been used by thousands. no questions will be raised over the quality of construction -- now questions will be raised of the quality of construction. this was supposed to be india's coming out party, showcasing its global power. even now, organizers insist they are on top of things. >> the situation is under control. we are doing our best. we are confident we will be able to complete the entirety of the restoration. >> but not everyone is convinced. some officials say unless india acts quickly, the event could be in jeopardy. bbc news, delhi. >> next tuesday, there will be a conference, which is not news in itself, but this one is in north korea an extremely rare. the last time it happened, 30 years ago, kim jong-il succeeded his father. now with doubts about his health, there is speculation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. we have this from the south korean capital, seoul. >> this is the only photo of kim jong-un , taken two decades ago. almost nothing is known about him except that he comes from are ruthless and powerful bloodline. kim il-sung and his son, kim
to the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us into a showdown. the only thing that can make as budget is a showdown. >> that showdown may force the government into further concessions, perhaps of face saver for the unions. two-thirds of the country are for reforms already approved by the house. it is president sarkozy who has the open hand. -- the upper hand. startednd's economy has to shrink again, despite coming out of recession earlier this year. gdp was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year. that contrasts with predictions it would have a small increase. the controversial diabetes drug avandia has been suspended. it has been linked to increased risk of heart failure. youtube and its owners have won a landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. each channel said its rights and violated when its videos were broadcast on youtube. the court found it was the copyright holder's responsibility to report the contents to youtube. the chairman for the international palate -- panel on climate change. it was reported that the panel contained an errone
to get their agenda through. they said don't run away from us yet. we're eight weeks away from election day. you see a lot of democrats in very tough districts really starting to put distance between themselves and the national democrats, president obama, speaker pelosi. >> lehrer: you also believe looking further at those polls about dissatisfaction with government. there's stuff in there that needs to be noted as well, correct some. >> awe-i have looked all year long. it's this volatility, almost anger that exists inside the electorate. take a look at these numbers because this is fascinating when you look at it through history. today 78% of respondents say tler dissatisfied or angry with government and how government works versus 22% who are satisfied or enthusiastic. compare that, jim, to november 1994. you remember bill clinton was president. newt gingrich, the republican revolution and the takeover of the house of representatives, you are seeing more dissatisfaction and anger in the electorate now than you did when republicans won 54 seats and took over the house. >> lehrer: now t
be a sign that god would want us to do it, that the american people do not want the mosque there and, of course, muslims do not want us to burn the koran . the imam has agreed to move the mosque. we have agreed to cancel our event on saturday. >> suarez: the pressure on pastor jones from around the world had been increasing on him throughout the day. just this morning, president obama added his voice to those of international leaders asking jones to call it off saying it would be a "recruitment bonanza for al qaeda." >> as commander-in-chief of the armed forces of the united states, i just want him to understand that this stunt that he is talking about pulling could greatly endanger our young men and women in uniform who are in iraq, who are in afghanistan. >> reporter: in response to fears of retaliation, the state department issued a travel warning today for citizens abroad. it also ordered u.s. embassies around the world to ramp up their security in preparation. in pakistan and afghanistan today protestors burned u.s. flags and shouted anti-american slogans in anticipation of the
at the white house just over three weeks ago. a state department official said today the u.s. was disappointed that israel allowed the building moratorium to expire. u.s. official middle east envoy george mitchell heads back to the region tomorrow with stops in israel and ramallah. both sides have accepted an invitation to resume talks in paris next month. >> ifill: for more on what's holding these talks together so far, we turn to ghaith al-omari, the advocacy director for the american task force on palestine, and a former advisor to president abbas. and david makovsky, senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy and the co-author of "myths, illusions, and peace." for let's talk about myths, illusions and peace, gait al on ari. what happened today. why didn't the palestinians walk away from the table as they promised they would if the settlements were not frozen. >> because they realized that the price of walking out from the talks is very high s very high from a domestic strategic perspective. ultimately they have no choice. and if you want to get a palestinian state the o
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. the u.s. treasury and insurance giant a.i.g. unveiled a plan today to speed up the repayment of more than $100 billion in federal bailout money. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, economic writers louise story of the "new york times" and roben farzad of "bloomberg business week" weigh the pluses and minuses of the deal. >> brown: then, kwame holman looks at the down-to-the-wire scramble as congress pushed to adjourn just weeks ahead of the midterm elections. >> suarez: judy woodruff talks to speaker of the house nancy pelosi about the battle over tax cuts and the stakes for democrats in november. >> our members left congress last night. they are confident that they would return in the majority. >> brown: special correspondent miles o'brien reports on a mississippi community's plan to use stimulus money for mass transit in rural areas. >> suarez: betty ann bowser updates the johnson and johnson story as company executives and the f.d.a. come under fire on capitol hill fo
and c.e.o. gary kelley. my first question: why did you do the deal? >> first of all, airtran brings us a number of things. they have a safe low cost high quality operation. they have a strong low fare brand. but most importantly, it provides us an opportunity to expand our route network. they fly places that we don't. we have very little overlapping routes. but notably, their largest operation is in atlanta. and we have no service to atlanta at all, as one example. it brings us more access to new york's laguardia airport, as well as first-time access for us to reagan national airport in washington d.c.. >> susie: where kelly, why did you do it now? >> i feel like we're ready now. first of all, things are so much better today than they were a year ago. our profit outlook is solid. we have plenty of cash on hand. we have a very strong balance sheet, with credit rating agencies affirming our credit rating today. so financially we're very well prepared for this. we also have a very strong leadership team. who is ready to add this major task to our list. and then we have the tools in place
collapsed under its own way. it would have been used by thousands of pedestrians as they walked over to the main venue. now questions are being raised over the quality of construction. it was not meant to be this way. this was supposed to be india's coming out party, showcasing a global showcase. >> it is under control. we are doing our best. we are confident we will be able to complete the entire renovation and cleaning. >> but not everyone is convinced. some say unless india acts quickly, the event could be in jeopardy. bbc news, delhi. >> next tuesday, there will be a conference. that is not moving news in itself, but this one is north korea, and it is extremely rare. the last time it happened 30 years ago, it led to kim jong-il succeeding his father. there is insulation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. -- there is speculation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. >> this is an early confirmed photo of the sun, taken almost two decades ago. almost nothing is known about him except that he comes from a ruthless bloodline. the eternal president and his son kim jon
, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the president accused the republicans of being fiscally irresponsible, but admitted that his own policies have not worked as quickly as hoped. congressional correspondent kwame holman reports. >> we got some business to do today. >> reporter: just eight weeks from election day, the president made his pitch in cleveland today to help the sputtering u.s. economy >> that means making long-term investments in education and clean energy; in basic research, technology, and infrastructure. >> reporter: and he also took a stand against extending the bush era tax cuts for the top 2% of earners, setting up a pre- election fight with republicans in congress. he accused the g.o.p. of being mr. obama repeatedl
why she left islam. >> i would never use the expression anti-islamic sentiment. i think it's more precise to distinguish between political islam on the one hand and religious islam and spiritual islam. and i have seen, yes, a growing knowledge on political islam, a growing interest in political islam, and a growing condemnation of political islam by more and more americans. i find both american men and women audiences that i speak condemn practices in the name of islam against women, the forced veiling of women, forced marriages of women, the guardian principle. there have been some eye-catching stories, for instance the 18-year old yemeni girl who was married off to an 80-year old man and who managed to escape that. so there is condemnation of these practices and there is condemnation of honor killings, condemnation of female genital mutilation. that is not a command in the koran, but in some obscure hadith, but practiced widely in muslim countries and among muslim immigrants to the u.s. >> so, does the thing that ms. a alreadyi mention done against women who are muslim cause som
. >> sreenivasan: the u.s. has set a one-year target for getting a framework peace agreement. u.s. troops joined iraqi forces today, in a raid in fallujah, the former insurgent stronghold. they were searching for a senior al-qaeda operative. it was unclear if he was one of the six people killed. earlier this week, american units fought in a two-day battle with al-qaeda militants. u.s. forces officially ended their combat role on september first, but they can still take part in operations, if the iraqis ask for help. in afghanistan, police fired into the air to disperse hundreds of protesters just outside kabul. at least one person was killed and 45 others wounded. the protesters were demonstrating against scattered burnings of the koran in the u-s last weekend. most of the injuries came from ricocheting bullets. police said the taliban are using the rallies to incite violence, ahead of next week's elections. lawmakers in france voted today to raise the retirement age to 62 to stem losses in the pension system. the national assembly, the lower house of the french parliament, approved sweeping ret
economy. his speech in cleveland, ohio highlighted his administration's plans for tax cuts. the u.s. secretary of state has said mexico's struck cartels increasingly look like an -- mexico's drug cartels increasingly look like an insurgency. the army was deployed against the cartels in 2006. the father of britain's prime minister has died. david cameron is the difference on the news that his father had suffered a stroke on holiday. he reached the hospital just before his father died. a russian passenger plane carrying 81 has crash landed, but all on board are uninjured. the jet was on its way to moscow when the power supply, fuel pump, and radio and navigation all failed. the jet came to rest safely in a nearby forest. hundreds of prisoners have escaped from a local jail in central nigeria as a gang of armed men attacked it. authorities are blaming a radical islamist sect. we have this report. >> police are hunting between 700 men and 800 men on the run. the gunmen who attacked the jail went from cell to cell, using bolt cutters, then setting fire to the building. intelligence indic
. he now has a best-selling autobiography, "open." his thoughts on the u.s. open and other topics in our conversation, coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: always pleased to have andre agassi on the program. he became the only man in history to win all four grand slam titles and an olympic gold medal. his best-selling autobiography is out now, "open." to not take long for this to get on the list as well. >> i guess not. it has been quite a year. tavis: would be mean about that? >> the feedback. this came with risks, but my hope was that those who chose
cry from 1994's "contract with america," and the grand signing ceremony on the steps of the u.s. capitol. today, house republican leaders appeared in shirt sleeves at a hardware and lumber store in suburban virginia 30 miles from capitol hill with this year's policy prescriptions. minority leader john boehner and his top lieutenants spelled out their central point. >> government is out of control in washington, and we need to rein it in, and begin a new drive for a smaller, less costly and more accountable government in our nation's capital. these are the things that the american people are demanding, >> reporter: while the backdrop has changed, republicans hope their document, called "a pledge to america," will produce similar results to 1994. that year's plan helped the party gain 54 seats and take the house majority for the first time in 40 years. one of the main architects of the 2010 version is california's kevin mccarthy. he accused democrats of ignoring the country's wishes. >> from the billion dollar bailouts to the stimulus package that failed to stimulate, to the gover
by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from london, a special edition of "charlie rose." >> charlie: lord peter mandelson is here. he's a member of britain's how was lords, former cabinet minister under prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown, a key architect of the labour campaign that helped his party rise to power in 1997. he served as secretary of state for trade and industry, secretary of state for northern ireland and secretary of state for business. he has now written a book about those years of public service. it is called "the third man, life at the heart of new labour," i am pleased to have peter mandelson back on this program. welcome. >> nice to be back. >> charlie: let me get to some of the controversy first. that tony blair is not happy that your book is coming out as it did, because -- and that somehow it's created a little tension between the two of you. >> no tensio
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 103 (some duplicates have been removed)